Pilate

His title was “Procurator” which could mean either an official overseeing taxes or a governor of a small province.
Pontius Pilate seemed to fill the second role as Procurator of Rome for Israel. One source described his office:

“He possessed civil, military, and criminal jurisdiction.”
(International Standard Bible Encyclopedia)

He hated his assignment and he hated the Jews; they hated him in return. His service was filled with violence toward them. The leaders of the Jews dealt with him in stony, false gestures of respect. He was temporary but the Roman government he represented seemed to be permanent. His headquarters were in Caesarea but for the Passover, a dangerous season of every year, he ruled from Jerusalem, a city he also despised. A sophisticated Roman who loved the public baths, theatres, and hedonistic nightlife of Rome, he was bored with the religiosity of Jerusalem. He was a miserable man doing a miserable job. From other sources, we learn that Pilate’s wife must have hated the place, too, although she was intrigued by the “one god” religion and the stories of the ancient prophets and their miracles. Perhaps the place was stealing her sanity. She was given these days to strange dreams.

The Sanhedrin Present Jesus
He had been up all night. He had progressed from agonizing prayer in the Garden to chains and beatings as He was grilled before the council. After such a night, there was nothing of the king in His appearance. Pilate barely glanced at Him—another crazy Jew captured by all these other crazy Jews. The delegation representing the Sanhedrin thrust Jesus before Pilate without explanation, afraid to speak before spoken to. Pilate waited for them to make their case. He wanted to get this over with as soon as possible. Finally, the leader of the delegation cautiously began to speak. He led with the things he judged to be most interesting to Pilate.

“We found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to pay taxes to Caesar,
saying that He Himself is Christ, a King.”

Wonderful! Another Messiah! Were there enough crosses in Jerusalem to handle this outbreak of deliverers? This was going to be simple. Any man who claimed to be king instead of Caesar was headed for his own cross.

Pilate took a closer look at Jesus. How could such a pitiful specimen be taken seriously as a king, real or potential? His face was deeply bruised from the fists and open palms of the Temple guards. His simple clothes were all askew—although that robe, was it woven in one piece?—was a nice touch. He was dirty and evidently friendless since there was no one to testify in His favor. To Pilate’s mind this was about the kind of king one would expect from these people.

King of the Jews?
He went along with the delegation. Let’s get this over with…

“Are You the King of the Jews?”

He smiled at the thought and waited for an answer. Would this filthy “messiah” admit to His crimes? Jesus’ hoarse voice could barely be heard.

“It is as you say.”

At this Pilate’s condescending smile erupted into laughter.

“I find no fault in this Man.”

Sensing they were losing their case, they extended their indictment.

“He stirs up the people, teaching throughout all Judea, beginning from Galilee to this place.”

When they mentioned Galilee, Pilate saw a means of escape from this distasteful business.

Scriptures:
Luke:23:1-5
NKJV
Then the whole multitude of them arose and led Him to Pilate. And they began to accuse Him, saying, “We found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to pay taxes to Caesar, saying that He Himself is Christ, a King.” Then Pilate asked Him, saying, “Are You the King of the Jews?” He answered him and said, “It is as you say.” So Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowd, “I find no fault in this Man.” But they were the more fierce, saying, “He stirs up the people, teaching throughout all Judea, beginning from Galilee to this place.”

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, You, the innocent Lamb of God, stood before the courts of men. Beneath the torn clothes and deep bruises, You were still great. Despite the accusations or true sinners, You remained without fault. Chained at the wrists and the feet, You were still filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. Angels stood at the ready to rescue You from this injustice if You gave the slightest signal. But rescue was not the plan of God. His plan was for this supreme injustice to pay the price of all the guilt of the world. Such love! Such amazing grace. Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! Amen.

Song:
I Find No Fault in Him

Words and Music: Andrea Crouch

I find no fault in Him. I find no fault in Him
Yet He was rejected, despised of men,
But I find no fault in Him.

They led Christ to Calvary but He never said one word
Just the cries of lost sinners Was all the Savior heard.
And then they pierced Him in the side
And His blood came streaming down.
And that’s how he purchased my salvation
And I find no fault in Him

I find no fault in Him. I find no fault in Him
Yet He was rejected despised of men,
But I find no fault in Him.

Semper Reformanda!
Stephen Phifer

© 2018 Stephen R. Phifer All Rights Reserved

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