Pilate

Pilate cared nothing for the religion of the people. He had two goals: control and peace.
The problem with control was that everybody wanted it. The challenge of peace was balancing all the groups competing for control. As the sun rose and Pilate attended to his morning routine, he had no idea he would make history that day.

The leaders in the Temple held an early morning meeting to prepare their presentation of Jesus to Pilate. How could they present Jesus as a threat, not just to their control mechanisms, but to those of Rome itself? They strengthened the bonds on Jesus’ hands and feet and shuffled Him into Pilate’s court. Hearing their confused case against this beaten, powerless man, Pilate was faintly amused that such a one could cause such a stir. In a voice dripping with irony he asked,

“Are You the King of the Jews?”

Jesus looked up, his face already showing deep bruises.

“It is as you say.”

It was like a punchline to a joke. Pilate smiled in spite of himself thinking, “Yes, this is the kind of king these miserable people would have!” Choking back his contempt for these accusers, Pilate listened to their conflicting testimonies, accusing Jesus of outrageous but harmless things, matters of great importance to these small-minded leaders but of no consequence to Rome. When Jesus did not attempt to answer their charges, Pilate began to be more interested in this man. He marveled that this one so eloquent in reputation would be so mute in court.

Barabbas
There was a custom at the time of the feast. To appease the people and maintain control without force, a prisoner could be released. They were holding a rebel, named Barabbas, who had committed murder. Pilate offered him to the people. The people, stirred by the priests, called for Jesus instead. Pilate knew the driving force behind the priests and other leaders was envy. Here was a man they could not control so their fragile peace was threatened. To be sure, Pilate made the question clear:

“What then do you want me to do with Him whom you call the King of the Jews?”

As if on a conductor’s cue, a shout of “Crucify Him!” became a rhythmic chant. Pilate’s protests of the innocence of Jesus could barely be heard over the chant. Pilate, for the sake of control and for the hope of peace, released Barabbas and delivered Jesus to the mob. Roman soldiers tied Jesus to a whipping post and did their worst. They took Him to headquarters to mock Him publically, stripping Him and putting a purple robe on Him. They twisted a crown of thorns and jammed it onto His head. They struck Him with a rod and pretended to worship Him. Finally tiring of their sport, they removed the “kingly” purple robe, put His own clothes back on Him, and led Him off to be crucified.

Neither Pilate nor the cruel soldiers knew that the blood they spilled that day would someday save the world.

Scripture:
Mark 15: 1-20
Immediately, in the morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council; and they bound Jesus, led Him away, and delivered Him to Pilate. Then Pilate asked Him, “Are You the King of the Jews?” He answered and said to him, “It is as you say.” And the chief priests accused Him of many things, but He answered nothing. Then Pilate asked Him again, saying, “Do You answer nothing? See how many things they testify against You!” But Jesus still answered nothing, so that Pilate marveled. Now at the feast he was accustomed to releasing one prisoner to them, whomever they requested. And there was one named Barabbas, who was chained with his fellow rebels; they had committed murder in the rebellion. Then the multitude, crying aloud, began to ask him to do just as he had always done for them. But Pilate answered them, saying, “Do you want me to release to you the King of the Jews?” For he knew that the chief priests had handed Him over because of envy. But the chief priests stirred up the crowd, so that he should rather release Barabbas to them. Pilate answered and said to them again, “What then do you want me to do with Him whom you call the King of the Jews?” So they cried out again, “Crucify Him!” Then Pilate said to them, “Why, what evil has He done?” But they cried out all the more, “Crucify Him!” So Pilate, wanting to gratify the crowd, released Barabbas to them; and he delivered Jesus, after he had scourged Him, to be crucified. Then the soldiers led Him away into the hall called Praetorium, and they called together the whole garrison. And they clothed Him with purple; and they twisted a crown of thorns, put it on His head, and began to salute Him, “Hail, King of the Jews!” Then they struck Him on the head with a reed and spat on Him; and bowing the knee, they worshiped Him. And when they had mocked Him, they took the purple off Him, put His own clothes on Him, and led Him out to crucify Him.

Prayer:
Lord Jesus, sometimes I feel that I am a victim of injustice. Sometimes, for the sake of Your Kingdom, I suffer for the sins of others. This is nothing new. The Bible warns us that we will join the “fellowship of Your sufferings”—suffering when we are innocent. However, none of us will ever suffer the level of injustice that You endured that day, not even close! Yet, You share Your strength to endure with us. Help us take joy in this privilege. With it comes the joy of knowing You better. Amen.

Song:
I Find No Fault in Him
Words and Music: Andrea Crouch

They led Christ to Calvary
And He spoke not one word.
Just the cries of lost sinners
Was all my Savior heard.
Then they pierced Him so deep in His side
Until the Blood came streaming down.
And that’s how Jesus purchased my salvation
And I find to fault in Him.

I find no fault in Him, I find no fault in Him,
Yet He was rejected, despised of men.
But I find no fault in Him.

Semper Reformanda!
Stephen Phifer

© 2018 Stephen R. Phifer All Rights Reserved

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